Ground stations

eOsphere ground receiving stations throughout the world

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eOsphere polar orbiting satellite receiving stations are designed for users who want to receive and process MODIS data from NASA’s Earth Observing System (EOS) Terra and Aqua, VIIRS, ATMS, CrIS and OMPS data from Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) Suomi-NPP and NOAA 20, AVHRR and ATOVS data from NOAA’s Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites (POES) and EUMETSAT Polar System (MetOp) satellites.

eOsphere DataCast satellite receiving stations are designed for users who want to receive EUMETCast, HimawariCast, CMACast & GEONetCast Digital Video Broadcast (DVB) transmissions to ingest and process data from geostationary weather satellites such as SEVIRI and HRV from Meteosat Second Generation (MSG), S-VISSR data from Feng Yun 2, AHI from Himawari and ABI from GOES.

eOsphere data acquisition and processing systems are designed for users who have existing antennas and satellite receivers and want to add acquisition and processing of any polar orbiting of geostationary satellite data. eOsphere has supplied data acquisition and processing systems to interface to a wide range of existing antenna and satellite receivers, providing technology refresh hardware and software to restore existing systems to an operation state or adding satellite acquisition and processing to existing operational systems. 

Please see the the Key technical features section below for further details.

 

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Since 2007 eOsphere satellite reception, acquisition and processing systems have been installed in many countries worldwide (including China, Cuba, Ecuador, Greece, India, Indonesia, Kuwait, Malaysia, Vietnam and the UK) to provide operational government agencies and research organisations with near real-time data for a wide range of applications including weather now- and fore-casting, aerosols and air quality, pasture, ocean colour and other environmental monitoring, detection and monitoring of natural and man-made disasters such as flooding, de-forestation, oil spills, volcanic eruptions ash, forest and wildfires, burn scar and smoke and extreme weather events using medium- and low-resolution visible, near, short wave and thermal infrared satellite image data.

Case studies

National Observatory of Athens (NOA), Athens, Greece

19_eOsphere_ground-station_greece_observatoryThe eOsphere Forest and Wildfire Monitoring system was supplied to the National Observatory of Athens (NOA), Athens, Greece, as part of the EU Project BEYOND: Building a Centre of Excellence for Earth Observation Based Monitoring of Natural Disasters, in 2014. The system is now used as part of the European Forest Fire Information System (EFFIS), a component of the Copernicus Emergency Management Service Risk and Recovery Mapping, routinely delivering forest fire products covering Central and Eastern Europe, the Mediterranean, Middle East and North Africa to the EFFIS system.

Vietnam National University (VNU-UET-FIMO), Hanoi, Vietnam

eOsphere_FIMO_vietnam-team-photoThe eOsphere Forest and Wild Fire Monitoring system was supplied to the Centre for Multidisciplinary Integrated Technologies for Field Monitoring (FIMO) at the University of Engineering and Technology (UET), Vietnam National University (VNU), Hanoi, Vietnam, in 2014. FIMO is a university teaching and research department specialising in field monitoring techniques, including remote sensing, with particular emphasis on forest fire and air pollution monitoring, as part of the national disaster monitoring system.

Institute of Meteorology (INSMET), Havana, Cuba

The eOsphere polar orbiting satellite reception system was supplied to the Instituto de Meteorología de Cuba (INSMET), Havana, Cuba, in 2017. INSMET is the national meteorological service for Cuba specialising in meteorological now- and fore-casting, numerical weather prediction and agrometeorology. INSMET has a long history of hurricane tracking in the Caribbean and captured many useful images of hurricanes Irma and Maria which passed closed by shortly after installation.

Regional Organisation for Protection of Marine Environment (ROPME), Kuwait

gs ROPME KuwaitThe eOsphere Marine Environment Monitoring system was supplied to the Regional Organisation for Protection of Marine Environment (ROPME) in 2018. ROPME is a multi-national organisation established to monitor the marine environment in the Arabian Gulf and around the Arabian Peninsular. The system is being used to monitor all aspects of water quality, particularly the detection and tracking of oil slicks, using MODIS and VIIRS visible channel reflectances, algal blooms and ocean fronts, with products published to the community via ROPME’s web-site, research and periodical reports.

University of Terengganu, Institute of Oceanography, Malaysia (UMT-INOS)

The eOsphere Marine Environment Monitoring system was supplied to the University of Terengganu, Institute of Oceanography (UMT-INOS), Malaysia, in 2012. UMT-INOS is teaching and research university specialising in monitoring of the marine environment and undertakes research of national importance in marine biodiversity, endangered species and marine environmental governance in Malaysian waters.

 

National Agency for Meteorology and the Environment Monitoring (NAMEM), Mongolia

NAMEMThe eOsphere polar orbiting satellite reception system was supplied to the National Agency for Meteorology and the Environment Monitoring (NAMEM) of Mongolia in 2007, upgraded for reception of new polar orbiting satellites in 2012 and technology refreshed in 2019 as part of the SIBELIUs project. NAMEM is the national meteorological service for Mongolia specialising in meteorological now- and fore-casting, numerical weather prediction and agrometeorology and includes the Information and Research Institute of Meteorology, Hydrology and Environment (IRIMHE) specialising in research for all applications of EO data in Mongolia.

Shanghai Ocean University (SHOU)

eOsphere_china-ground-station_mission-controlThe eOsphere Marine Environment Monitoring system was supplied to the Shanghai Ocean University SHOU) in 2007, upgraded for reception of new polar orbiting and geostationary satellites in 2013 and 2015 and technology refreshed in 2018. SHOU is teaching and research university specialising in monitoring of the marine environment, fisheries and aquaculture. The system is used as a teaching tool for ocean remote sensing and undertakes research into the marine environment of the Chinese sea areas.

Key technical features

The eOsphere polar orbiting satellite ground receiving station typically includes:

  • 2.4m or 3.0m tracking antenna.
  • X-band (or dual X-/L-band) RF front end.
  • Optional radome for protection from the environment
  • Multi-mode or fully configurable satellite receiver.
  • High specification acquisition system including ingest card and software to automatically schedule, track, receive and ingest level 0 data from scheduled visible satellite passes.

High specification processing system including software to processing received data to level 1B (calibrated and navigated) data and level 2 (environmental product) data, re-project, re-format and disseminate level 1B and 2 data to GIS systems, GeoServer, Open Data Cube or web servers.

The eOsphere polar orbiting satellite ground receiving station is designed to receive:

  • EOS Terra & Aqua (MODIS) Direct Broadcast (DB)
  • JPSS Suomi-NPP & NOAA-20 (VIIRS, ATMS, CrIS, OMPS) High Rate Data (HRD)
  • Feng Yun 3 (MERSI) Mission Picture Transmission (MPT)
  • NOAA POES (AVHRR, ATOVS) High Resolution Picture Transmission (HRPT)
  • EUMETSAT Polar System (EPS MetOp) (AVHRR, ATOVS, IASI, ASCAT) Advanced HRPT

The eOsphere polar orbiting satellite ground receiving station is designed to be easily upgradeable to receive future polar orbiting satellites such as JPSS-2,3, EPS Second Generation (EPS-SG) and Feng Yun 3D+.

All the polar orbiting satellites received are free-to-air (i.e. no licensing costs) and provide multiple medium resolution (250m to 1km), visible, near-, shortwave- and thermal-infrared images.

Typically, there are 4-6 visible satellite passes per day from 4 satellites, with swath widths of between 2,300km and 3,000km, providing coverage of the area within ~3,000km  of the satellite ground receiving station multiple times every day and night.

The eOsphere DataCast satellite ground receiving station typically includes:

  • 0.9m to 3.0m fixed parabolic antenna.
  • Ku- or C-band RF front end.
  • Networked DVB-S2 receiver
  • High specification acquisition system including DataCast client software to ingest broadcast level 0 data from the DVB-S2 receiver.
  • High specification processing system (or systems) including software to processing received data to level 1B (calibrated and navigated) data and level 2 (environmental product) data, re-project, re-format and disseminate level 1B and 2 data to GIS systems, GeoServer, Open Data Cube or web servers.

The eOsphere DataCast satellite ground receiving station is primarily designed to receive:

  • Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) (SEVIRI, HRV) data from geostationary MSG satellites at 0E and 41.5E
  • GOMS / Elektro (MSU GS) data from geostationary satellite at 76E
  • Fen Yung 2 (S-VISSR) data from geostationary satellites at 86E and 105E
  • Himawari (AHI) data from geostationary satellites at 140E
  • GOES (ABI) data from geostationary satellites at 75W and 135W

The eOsphere DataCast satellite ground receiving station can also be used to receive derived meteorological products and polar orbiting satellite data from NOAA POES, EPS MetOp, Suomi NPP &  NOAA 20 received from a network of European and North Atlantic ground stations.

The eOsphere DataCast satellite receiving station is designed to be easily upgradeable to receive future geostationary satellites such as Meteosat Third Generation (MTG) and Feng Yun 4.

A nominal annual license fee is typically required for commercial organisations but otherwise all the satellites received are free-to-air (and provide multiple medium resolution (500m to 5km), visible, near-, shortwave- and thermal-infrared images.

Typically, complete Earth disk images are transmitted every 10, 15 or 30 minutes, providing coverage within ~+/-81 degrees of latitude and longitude of the sub-satellite point from 48 to 144 times every day.

Products typically generated by eOsphere satellite receiving stations include:

  • Calibrated and navigated radiances (Level 1B)
  • Cloud mask, type and phase
  • Cloud top properties
  • Atmospheric aerosols, smoke, volcanic ash
  • Atmospheric profiles of temperature, humidity and ozone
  • Active fires and burn scar
  • Corrected surface reflectance
  • Vegetation, drought and water indices
  • Land Surface Temperature
  • Snow and sea Ice
  • Ocean colour
  • Sea Surface Temperature

All products generated by the eOsphere polar orbiting and DataCast satellite receiving station are standard products always available in the same formats as available from the satellite operators but can also be re-projected to a wide range of standard map geographic (e.g. WGS84) and projected (e.g. Plate Carree, Mercator, Polar Stereographic, Universal Transverse Mercator, Albers, Azimuthal, Cylindrical, Orthographic) co-ordinate systems, in a wide range of scientific data bitmap image formats including GeoTIFF, NetCDF, HDF4/5, GRIB2, ESRI and other flat binary file formats for easy integration into GIS systems, GeoServers, Open Data Cube and web servers.   

The eOsphere satellite receiving stations are complete standalone automated end-to-end systems from scheduling of reception of satellite transmissions to the delivery of environmental data products to geospatial databases and websites.

The eOsphere satellite receiving stations also includes a fully featured visualisation system for display of satellite imagery and products, along with tools for re-projection, re-sampling, aggregation, re-formatting and delivery of products.

eOsphere offers a complete solution including requirements specification, delivery, installation and commissioning of all equipment, full integration with end-user’s infrastructure, training and ongoing maintenance and support. The user does not need existing or additional IT infrastructure.